Newswire | Salle Bourgie Programming Inspired by the Themes of the Exhibition ᑐᓴᕐᓂᑐᑦ TUSARNITUT! Music Born of the Cold

0
Advertisement / Publicité

This page is also available in / Cette page est également disponible en: Francais (French)

Montreal, Friday November 11, 2022 – Bourgie Hall is pleased to present its programming inspired by the themes of the exhibition ᑐᓴᕐᓂᑐᑦ TUSARNITUT! Music Born of the Cold, on display at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts from November 10, 2022 to March 12, 2023. This exhibition addresses a hitherto little explored theme: the profound and lasting links uniting music and visual art of the people of Inuit Nunaat (the territory inhabited by the Inuit). Three events echoing the exhibition offer an incursion into the Inuit imagination, demonstrating to what extent music plays a major role: the two main genres showcased here, throat singing (katajjaniq) and drum dancing (qilaujjaniq), are intertwined with the environment and the territory. By making it possible to discover  the rich traditions of this music born of the cold, they are also part of a broader process of resurgence and revalorisation of Indigenous artistic practices.

The Inuit Traditional Music Listening Circle presents three meetings in a convivial setting conducive to dialogue, addressing the rich range of Inuit musical practices, on Saturdays November 19, 2022, December 10, 2022 and January 28, 2023 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Claudine Caron, musicologist and researcher associated with the Laboratoire Imaginaire Nord (UQAM), will moderate these workshops in the company of three Inuit musicians: Nina Segalowitz, Lydia Etok and Sarah Siaza Carriere. Songs, drum dancing and throat singing from various regions will be featured. Please note that these workshops will take place in French. These workshops are presented in collaboration with Oktoécho, a variable-geometry ensemble specializing in the blending of Middle Eastern, Western and Indigenous music.

Advertisement / Publicité

On Wednesday, November 23, 2022, at 5:30 p.m., Jean-Jacques Nattiez, ethnomusicologist, Inuit music specialist and invited curator of the exhibition, will give a lecture at the Maxwell-Cummings Auditorium titled: What is Inuit Music? He will show how the Inuit represented their music through their sculptures and engravings. Notably, the two main genres, drum dancing and throat singing, though musically very different, share common characteristics (the demonstration of endurance, the spirit of competition), allowing us to speak of characteristic Inuit music.

To conclude, on Friday, February 10, 2023, Inupiak scholar and violinist from Alaska Heidi Aklaseak Senungetuk will present a concert-lecture at Bourgie Hall titled QUTAAŊUAQTUIT: Dripping Music. Drawing on her family’s history, her encounters and her research, she has developed a highly personal approach to performance. During this presentation, she will perform several works on the violin, some of which were composed for her. This event is part of a Bourgie Hall’s Musical Canvases offer, which combines a visit of the exhibition at 4 p.m., followed by the concert-lecture at 5:30 p.m.


PROGRAMMING

Inuit Traditional Music Listening Circle

 Saturdays November 19, 2022, December 10, 2022 and January 28, 2023 – 3:30 p.m.  to 5 p.m.

A series of three meetings, featuring three remarkable guests, create a convivial space conducive to dialogue in order to discover the full range of the rich Inuit musical practices, through recordings and discussions.

Claudine Caron, moderator: musicologist and researcher associated with the Laboratoire Imaginaire Nord (UQAM)

Guests:

Nina Segalowitz (November 19)

Lydia Etok (December 10)

Sarah Siaza Carriere (January 28)

Location: The Salon (Jean-Noël Desmarais Pavilion, Level 2)

Cost: $30 ($15 for Museum members)

Tickets and information


Lecture – What is Inuit Music?

 Wednesday, November 23, 2022 – 5:30 p.m.

Guest curator of the exhibition ᑐᓴᕐᓂᑐᑦ TUSARNITUT! Music Born of the Cold, ethnomusicologist Jean-Jacques Nattiez will show how the Inuit represented their music through their sculptures and engravings. Presented in French.

Jean-Jacques Nattiez, ethnomusicologist and professor emeritus at the University of Montreal

Location: Maxwell-Cummings Auditorium

Cost: $10 (free for Museum members and those aged 34 years and under)

Tickets and information


Concert-lecture – QUTAAŊUAQTUIT : Dripping Music

Friday, February 10, 2023 – 5:30 p.m.

Drawing on her family’s history, her encounters and her research, Heidi Aklaseak Senungetuk, an Inupiak musician and scholar originating from Alaska, has developed a highly personal approach to performance. During this presentation, she will perform several contemporary works on violin, some of which were composed for her, reflecting her unique sensibility.

Location: Bourgie Hall

Cost : $24 ($21 for Museum members / $13 for those aged 34 years and under)

Musical canvas

  • 4 p.m.: guided tour of the exhibition
  • 5:30 p.m.: concert-lecture

Tickets and information


Bourgie Hall

Inaugurated in September 2011, Bourgie Hall is a 462-seat concert hall at the heart of the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. Possessing exceptional acoustics, it has quickly made a name for itself as one of Canada’s most beloved venues for concert music. Located in the nave of the former Erskine and American Church, its spectacular architecture includes a collection of twenty Tiffany stained glass windows that is unique in the country. Bourgie Hall presents over a hundred concerts a year in various musical styles, ranging from jazz to classical works, from Baroque music to contemporary creations. Its high-calibre programming features some of the most prominent Canadian and international musicians of their generation, whether they be at the beginning of their careers or already well established. bourgiehall.ca

This page is also available in / Cette page est également disponible en: Francais (French)

Share:

About Author

Leave A Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.