Browsing: World Music

Montreal, Saturday, 9 July 2016 – When it comes to musical pleasure, nothing delivered like this 37th edition of the Festival International de Jazz de Montréal, presented by TD in collaboration with Rio Tinto! For 11 days and nights, from June 29 to July 9, 2016, jazz unfolded in all its sounds, shapes and styles… a Festival of effervescence and serenity, full of raw, passionate, challenging, inspiring, impressive musical moments! With a program this eclectic and packed with options, with young newcomers and veterans, Montréalers welcoming tourists, and fans of jazz, electronica, blues, hip-hop, etc. rubbing shoulders under the stars of our…

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+ Cleveland Classical talks with guitarist Denis Azabagić about winning prizes, his wife and duo partner flautist Eugenia Moliner, and practice philosophy. “I remember when I came to the U.S. more than a decade ago. I opened the yellow pages and found an ad that said, ‘Learn to play the piano without practice.’ I thought, who in the world could put out such an ad? I mean how can you lie like that — because that’s impossible. We would all like to get our things in life the easy way, but music is something that certainly doesn’t happen like that.…

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Lila Downs performed last Saturday night at the Métropolis theatre for the Montreal International Jazz Festival. Close to 2,000 fans gathered to see the singer-songwriter and her band perform a repertoire of Mexican rhythms fused with jazz instruments and players. It was precisely because of this capacity for mixing styles, while remaining true to her cultural roots, that she received the 2016 Antonio Carlos Jobim award as “an artist distinguished in the field of world music whose influence on the evolution of jazz and cultural crossover is widely recognized.” These cultural and musical crossovers are an important part of Lila Downs’s…

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“The most beautiful piece written for the clarinet is Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto in A major and we did a study on it at the Louisiana University of Jazz with my friend Wynton Marsalis… We arrived to the conclusion that Mozart was not from Austria, he is from the New Orleans! And that the right way to play Mozart’s Clarinet Concerto in A major is as a blues, in fact, a New Orleans blues!” —Paquito D’Rivera, Pollack Hall, 17 June 2016 Winner of 14 Grammy Awards with a discography of more than 30 solo albums since he first started his career…

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135 Years ago this day, March 25th 1881, Bela Bartok was born. Regarded as one of Hungary’s greatest composers, Bela had a musical curiosity that would change the way the West sees and understands music. He was in his early 30s when he decided to pack the most modern recording instrument of the time, the Edison Phonograph, and head to Algeria to research Arab Folk Music. Originally Bela was set to go alone, but it the last minute he suggested Marta (wife) to join him. And off they went. They traveled from Marseille to the port of Sakîkdah in Algeria…

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Ana Sokolovic (Photo : Alain Lefort)Ana Sokolovic on Serbian FolkloreBy Viktor Lazarov Composer Ana Sokolovic is very well known to most contemporary classical music lovers in Canada. In its 2011-2012 season, the Société de musique contemporaine du Québec (SMCQ) dedicated its third Série Hommage to Ana Sokolovic and brought her music to new listeners in the far corners of the country. Today, Ana Sokolovic is an icon of the Canadian contemporary music scene – an artist whose work is a unique blend of two very distinct cultures. Ana Sokolovic’s success story is of special interest to me as we share…

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Author : (Réjean Beaucage)

In March, Kiya Tabassian, the artistic director of the ensemble Constantinople and sitar virtuoso, will attend the premier of one of his works by the Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, conducted by Kent Nagano, as part of the Adventures in the East concert. Portrait of a free-spirited voyager. Kiya Tabassian with the Ensemble Constantinople and dancers in a performance of Sunya. Photo Michael Slobodian It’s difficult to attach a label to Kiya Tabassian. He plays a traditional Persian instrument, the sitar, but he also composes works for the Nouvel Ensemble Moderne. He takes inspiration from early music, which he plays from…

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Japanese Children SongsDiana Damrau, sopranoOrchestre symphonique de Montreal / Kent Nagano, conductorAnalekta AN2 9131***** This disc of 22 Japanese children songs is a complete delight. Conductor Kent Nagano was singularly responsible for its genesis. The accompanying booklet gives a detailed account of how Nagano, a third generation Japanese from California, started researching these songs after hearing his wife sing them to their daughter. These hauntingly beautiful songs, newly orchestrated, were first heard in two live performances in February-March 2010 at Salle Wilfrid Pelletier in Montreal, and the part of the recording involving the soloist was recorded in Germany in June…

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by Paul E. RobinsonIn March 2009, I was a Guest Lecturer at the Central Conservatory of Music (CCOM) in Beijing, China. My audience was a class of young conductors. My lecture, titled “Stokowski: the Limits of Interpretation,” considered the many changes that Stokowski had made in the scores of the music he conducted and how these changes might be defended and justified. Moments before my talk was to begin, I had a distinguished surprise visitor, 92-year old Huang Feili, (photo: left) the man who had founded the conducting department of this institution back in 1956. His presence not only did me great honour, but gave me great…

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By Christine Lee Longueuil, July 14 The great thing about Longueuil’s International Percussion Festival is the array of different activities offered: a drum workshop, a dance workshop, stalls selling goods, a mini-museum, restaurants right by the street, concerts, and dance shows. As I wandered up and down the street, I even came across a circus performance of aerial silks. Thursday featured a free performance by Bïa & Paulo Ramos with live painting by Brazilian painter Flavio Freitas. Brazil-born Montrealer Paulo Ramos and his band displayed a suaveness that captured the audience’s hearts straight away. The Latin rhythms made the crowd…

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