Browsing: Next Great Art Song

Meet Canada’s latest opera sensation. Last season was 21-year-old Toronto mezzo Emily D’Angelo’s break out. Like most singers in their last year of studies, D’Angelo auditioned for multiple competitions and training programs, winning often (see sidebar), culminating in March as one of five winners of the 2016 Metropolitan Opera Auditions in New York and taking home $15,000 USD. D’Angelo’s smooth legato and dark timbre easily won over the judges with her performance of the voice lesson from Rossini’s Barber of Seville and “Must the Winter Comes so soon?” from Samuel Barber’s Vanessa. Singing at the Met’s large house in front…

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Art song, one of music’s most intriguing and often perplexing mysteries, is a dauntingly difficult genre. Yet, it is infinitely rewarding – from both a performer’s and the public’s point of view. Singing art song often appears natural and obvious, but it comprises a host of complex elements and dimensions. The primary, and perhaps most often neglected aspect of the impact of any vocal recital or liederabend is that it involves not just a singer, but a team. The collaborative pianist (rather than a mere “accompanist”) is part of the team. The relationship between singer and pianist is at the…

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La Scena Musicale is celebrating the Art Song with the worldwide survey, What is your favourite art song? Submit your vote at www.nextgreatartsong.com. Conductor Sergio Barza shares his three choices below. 3. Schubert – Gretchen am Spinnrade “My peace is gone, My heart is heavy, I will find it never and never more. Where I do not have him, That is the grave, The whole world Is bitter to me. My poor head Is crazy to me, My poor mind Is torn apart. My peace is gone, My heart is heavy, I will find it never and never more. For him only, I look Out the…

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The following six French mélodies represent, for me, essential elements of French art song, most notably the setting of the most lyrical of languages and the poetic inspiration that was so fundamental to the genre’s importance. It also struck me (in retrospect) that there is, in all these selections, a nostalgia, a melancholy, an elegance that is, for me, essentially French. Gabriel Fau­­ré: Cinq Mélodies “de Venise” Op. 58, No. 5: “C’est l’extase” (Verlaine) “C’est l’extase” is the fifth and final song of Fauré’s cycle, Mélodies “de Venise” and is a restrained expression of the intensity of love. While the…

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In honour of Saint Valentine’s Day, I offer three great love songs that particularly move me. Robert Schumann: Du bist wie eine Blume Robert Schumann’s early and abiding literary influence was Heinrich Heine, the foremost German lyric Romantic poet. Schumann set Heine’s famous poem Du bist wie eine Blume (“You are like a flower”) as part of his opus 25 called Myrthen. Though commonly regarded as a song cycle, Schumann preferred to call it a musical “diary” conceived as an expression of love. He composed it as a wedding gift for his beloved Clara Wieck, and Du bist wie eine…

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Author : (Wah Keung Chan)

Mahler’s little-regarded serenade gets my vote! What makes a Great Art Song? I usually consider a song great when I can’t get it out of my head or when I can’t stop singing or humming it. As the saying goes, you know it when you hear it. But in my opinion, a song finds its greatest purpose as an expression of love or as a serenade. Consequently, I’m drawn to great melodies. What’s in a melody and how can a performance do it justice? This was the question nagging me on September 20 as I left Orchestre Métropolitain’s opening concert…

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CASP has exciting news!We are happy to announce that in the 2015­-16 season CASP will begin a new series of concerts:The Canadian Art Song Project Recital Series.This, the first series of ticketed concerts presented by CASP, marks the next stage in our artistic development and mission of introducing Canadian audiences to their own art song repertoire. After four years of annual “Celebration of Canadian Art Song” concerts as a part of the Free Concert Series in the Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre, CASP will expand to offer two additional intimate recitals starring established and emerging Canadian artists proudly presenting Canadian works alongside…

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