Browsing: Orchestral

If you go out and buy the Minnesota Orchestra’s Bis recording of Mahler’s fifth symphony, rest assured that you need never buy another. It’s resoundingly well played in every department, devoid of the bravado that impairs some American performances, and discreetly shaped by the music director Osmo Vänskä, who finds organic solutions for some of the more abrupt shifts in the score. Vänskä’s approach is coolly objective. He plays what is in the score and allows the listener to find his or her own level of emotional engagement. The Adagietto, at twelve and a half minutes, is slower than is…

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Imagine attending an entire year of recitals at Carnegie Hall or Der Musikverein. At either concert hall you will no doubt encounter the pianists András Schiff, Barry Douglas, Richard Goode, Evgeny Kissin, Yefim Bronfman, Daniil Trifonov or Yuja Wang. Your listening path would also include at least one of the leading violin virtuosi of our time, perhaps Joshua Bell, Leonidas Kavakos or Janine Jansen. You may also add to your annual subscription the experience of hearing Pablo Ferrandez, George Li, or Daniel Lozakovich, three rising stars of their generation. And, as an opera lover your radar will meet Esa-Pekka Salonen…

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Joliette, July 26, 2017 – Le Festival de Lanaudière is pleased to welcome you to concerts of the fifth week of its 40th season.  On Friday, July 28 at 8 p.m. in Salle Rolland-Brunelle in Joliette, Christine Jensen leads the National Jazz Orchestra of Montreal in a dazzling program of two major works, one of them written by her: Under the Influence, in which she pays tribute to five great jazz artists. Also on the program is a suite of excerpts from Gershwin’s immortal opera Porgy and Bess. The next day, Saturday, July 29 at 8 p.m. at the Amphithéâtre Fernand-Lindsay, the Festival Orchestra, the Fernand Lindsay Choir, baritone Hugo Laporte and mezzo-soprano Marie-Andrée Mathieu will rouse you…

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Joliette, July 19, 2017 – Le Festival de Lanaudière is pleased to welcome you to concerts of the fourth week of its 40th season.  On Friday, July 21 at 8 p.m. at the Amphithéâtre Fernand-Lindsay, pianist Marc-André Hamelin takes you into a world of passion and fantasy in sonatas by Haydn, Feinberg and Beethoven, followed by Schumann’s Fantasy Op. 17. The next day, Saturday, July 22 at 8 p.m. at the Amphithéâtre Fernand-Lindsay, the Orchestre Métropolitainunder the direction of Mathieu Lussier performs Mozart’s Overture to The Magic Flute and Symphony No. 41. After intermission, Marc-André Hamelin joins the orchestra for Beethoven’s grandest piano concerto, No. 5 (Emperor). On Sunday, July 23 at 2 p.m. at the Amphithéâtre Fernand-Lindsay, come support the up-and-coming generation by…

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HALIFAX, NS – This summer, Symphony Nova Scotia proudly presents its first-ever summer season, featuring 13 FREE concerts and events in public venues throughout Halifax from July 17 to 31. The festivities will feature Symphony Nova Scotia musicians giving live performances at venues like the Alderney Landing Theatre, the Keshen Goodman Public Library, and the Halifax Central Library’s O’Regan Hall. Highlights include the RDV 2017 Tall Ships Regatta Celebration on the waterfront with Natalie MacMaster, full-orchestra performances celebrating Nova Scotia with singer Reeny Smith and Mi’kmaq drummer Trevor Gould in Halifax and Dartmouth, and a charming afternoon Tea Dance with Halifax Pride at the Halifax Citadel. The full-orchestra concerts will be conducted by Daniel Bartholomew-Poyser, Symphony Nova Scotia’s Artist in Residence and Community…

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The second concerto for cello by Dmitri Shostakovich is the least ingratiating of the six he wrote, two for each major instrument. Opening with a gloomy, growling monologue, the solo part is matched in misery by the orchestra. The concerto was written in 1966 and first performed by Mstislav Rostropovich at a Moscow concert to mark the composer’s 60th birthday. Knowing that public pessimism was an offence in the Soviet Union, Shostakovich held nothing back. The four-minute middle movement is friskier, though no less morbid than the opening Largo. Only in the finale does the composer express some relief and gratitude…

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In May 1933, the composer Paul Frankenburger left Munich for Tel-Aviv, where he Hebraised his surname and became teacher of the first generation of Israeli-born composers. An austere man, steeped in German Bildung, Ben-Haim grew excited by the microtonal singing of Jews from Arab lands and accompanied the Yemenite performer Bracha Zefira at the piano on extensive concert tours. His orchestral music, however, remained strictly tonal. The Concerto Grosso, premiered by the Palestine Symphony Orchestra under Issay Dobrowen, takes its neo-classical form from Stravinsky and Strauss and its expansive slow movement from Mahler and Brahms. That said, Ben-Haim is…

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News by Orchestre symphonique de Montréal Transmitted by CNW Group on June 29, 2017 12:45 ET Kent Nagano will be passing the torch in 2020 The music director will continue to lead the Orchestra for the next three seasons MONTREAL, June 29, 2017 /CNW Telbec/ – The Orchestre symphonique de Montréal (OSM) and Kent Nagano are announcing today that, after a long deliberation, he has decided not to accept the invitation by the OSM to extend his contract as music director beyond 2020. “We intend to continue the relationship with Maestro Nagano at the end of his term in three…

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Vancouver, BC – The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra is making the final preparations to welcome 90 participants for the 2017 Vancouver Symphony Orchestral Institute at Whistler. The immersive, ten-day training program returns to the Resort Municipality of Whistler for a third year, where Rising Stars of the classical music world will share this unique opportunity to live and perform in a spectacular natural setting. The VSO is pleased to acknowledge a new partnership with Stingray in support of activities at the VSOIW. Through its Rising Stars program, Stingray has generously supported tuition scholarships, and sponsored masterclasses and coaching sessions for chamber…

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Halifax, NS – Symphony Nova Scotia is proud to announce that Dr. Kelly-Marie Murphy is the inaugural winner of its new Maria Anna Mozart Award for Canadian women composers. Launched in 2016, the Maria Anna Mozart Award supports the work of Canadian women composers, providing funds for Symphony Nova Scotia to commission and perform a new symphonic work by a Canadian woman every three years. The award is the first of its kind in Canada, and was made possible through the generosity of Halifax resident and Symphony supporter Dr. Jane Gordon. “We received so many applications, full of incredibly good music – I am always amazed at the wealth…

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